Waterbirds are a globally-distributed, species-rich group of birds that are dependent upon wetland habitats. They are important indicators of ecosystem condition, particularly in wetlands that provide a range of services and functions for human communities. This study was the first global analysis of inland-breeding waterbird distributions using collated data for 471 waterbird species.

Aims

To identify global areas of high waterbird diversity and evaluate the ability of current protected area networks (PANs) to protect threatened waterbirds.

Partners

University of Bath, Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Ramsar Convention, Charles Stuart University, University of Cambridge.

Outputs

Published paper (see below).

Outcomes

Conservation organisations and relevant conventions now have access to information on patterns of waterbird species richness across the globe, and the ability to evaluate the effectiveness of regional PANs.

References

Williamson, L., Hudson, M., O'Connell, M., Davidson, N., Young, R., Amano, T. and Székely, T. (2013). Areas of high diversity for the world's inland-breeding waterbirds. Biodiversity and Conservation 22: 1501-1512.

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